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food and wine pairing

Tips for Great Food and Wine Pairing Recipes

Great food and wine pairing recipe are a menu that allows guests to easily enjoy complimentary high-quality food and wines. It can be any type of menu, too. And how it occurs varies greatly. It may mean: pairing one particular wine with one particular dish. It may also mean: pairing two wines together.

Food and wine pairings can have a big impact on the flavor and texture of whatever dish you pair them with. If the wines complement one another well enough, then the food will also benefit, too. The flavors will meld and flow harmoniously, resulting in a delicious meal that people will undoubtedly love. It’s just that simple. However, not everyone knows how to pull it off. Here are some simple guidelines.

The stronger the wine, the sweeter the food

Let’s start with the basics. There are three basic tastes found in wine or food: sweet, bitter, and acid. Sweet tastes are usually described as floral, while bitter tastes are usually described as meaty. There are other subtle variations, but those are the most common.

Sweet foods have a soft texture and delicate flavor. Examples include fruit desserts like apple pie or puddings made with cream cheese. These foods have a lot of sugar and don’t go very well with strong food types. Conversely, bitter foods have a sharp, bitter taste. Examples include beef stew or fish dishes.

The rule of thumb when it comes to food and wine pairing is: the stronger the wine, the more sweet the food must be. For example, red wine in a dish with chicken can overpower the natural sweetness of the chicken. So you would pair red wines with milder meats and cheeses.

When paired with certain foods, the sweetness is actually subtracted from the overall flavor, giving an overall feeling of less vibrant flavor and richness. Sweet wines can come through as simply sweet or as over-the-top with the highest levels of tannin.

food and wine pairing

Acidic food and sharp wine

Next, let’s look at acidity. In food and wine pairing, acidic food will enhance the flavor and fullness of the wine. A sharp, bitter flavor can be brought about by acidic food. Some of the most popular examples of acidic foods include garlic, onions, cabbages, tomatoes, asparagus, bell peppers, and pineapple. On the flip side, an alkaline wine like a zesty Vardon or Merlot will counteract the sourness of acidic foods.

Finally, let’s look at acidity and clarity. These are related to one another but play major roles in matching flavors with wines. Clear wines have light, crisp tastes, whereas foods with a greater amount of acidity have a fuller body and deeper, earthier flavor. For example, tart apples matched with a crisp, light Riesling will almost seem alive because it has that earthy taste.

There are three basic tastes you can pair with each vintage wine, and it helps to know which flavors evoke that feeling in the palette. The first one and simplest to describe are sweet. Food and wine do not have to complement each other in order to be a good match; they should be complimentary. Commonly used terms for describing this taste are fruity (i.e. apple, raspberry, orange), crisp, dry, and rich. Tons of acidity or bitterness are also considered to be characteristic of sweet wines.

Bitter food

Food and wine don’t always have to complement each other, they can instead go well together if they have a different taste profile such as acidic and spicy or herbal and woody. A lot of people will describe their flavors this way.

Lastly, there’s the bitter flavor profile. This is one where the wine has a very distinct flavor that simply makes the dish taste less like the dish would without the wine. For example, eating garlic instead of potato soup, or fish instead of beef stew are examples of this. It can also come from tart or salty foods and wines, so if you pair food and this type of wine, you’re almost guaranteed to end up with a dish that does not go well with the other. So if you want to find a complimentary wine pairing, think about what kind of flavor profiles you find in the dish you’re preparing; that way you’re much more likely to come up with a dish that goes well together.

Practice, practice, practice

So now you’ve got your basic knowledge about the basics of pairing food and wine. What’s next? Simple! Practice what you know! Match different foods and wines and keep tasting until you’re happy that you’ve found a drink that enhances each dish and compliments the other without being overwhelming.

sommelier and selection of wine

Who is a Sommelier?

A sommelier, (or wine steward), is a knowledgeable and trained wine expert, usually working in luxury fine dining establishments, who typically specialize in both wine and food pairing and all facets of wine service. The position of the sommelier in modern fine dining establishments is far more specialized and knowledgeable than that of a mere “wine waiter.”

While a wine waiter was an employee in a fine dining establishment, serving the guests, who were often experts in wines, sommeliers are hired based on their recommendation and experience in fine dining and have been for decades. Although sommeliers are expected to know very little about wines and their flavor profiles, they are often consulted in matters relating to their knowledge of wine pairing, and their ability to pick the perfect bottle.

Today, virtually all fine dining establishments employ a sommelier on staff. In some cases, sommeliers are actually part of the restaurant staff, and in other cases, the restaurant will hire a sommelier only when requested by a client. Typically, sommeliers are employed only in places where wine is more widely used, such as fine dining restaurants. In these establishments, sommeliers assist chefs and other food professionals with the selection of wines to be served at the table. However, today, they may also work in hotels and other dining establishments that do not offer a full-service fine dining experience.

Help with selection of wine

Generally, a sommelier is employed to guide patrons in matters relating to the selection of wines. The sommelier will usually have a full wine portfolio, which he will share with his patrons. The wine portfolio is often displayed on a wall inside the restaurant, and many of these establishments also have a separate section of the store where the sommelier work. These stores are great for patrons who are just getting started with wine because they can learn about the different varietals that are available and which ones are best paired with certain dishes. While it is important for new patrons to have an idea of the various kinds of wines that are available, it is equally important for experienced wine connoisseurs to keep their portfolios updated with the latest selections.

Be wine waiter

Another position that a sommelier can hold is that of wine waiter. Wine waiters are typically the servers who serve wine to customers at tables in dining establishments. However, in most establishments, a sommelier will not be able to serve the guests themselves, as that task would be too much responsibility for a single person. However, if you prefer to be in charge of the serving, this could be a great opportunity for you to let your entrepreneurial side come out.

If you are interested in working in the kitchen at a fine dining restaurant, then you may have an opportunity to take on additional responsibilities once you become a sommelier. You may be required to work in the kitchen during business hours, as well, preparing food and cleaning up after customers. However, the majority of sommeliers work off-site from home. You will, however, still need to maintain your current level of sommelier knowledge, which means that you should continue to research the latest offerings in the world of fine wines. Your online wine education program can help you achieve both of these goals.

sommelier and selection of wine

Be wine steward

Some sommeliers choose to become wine stewards instead. A wine steward is responsible for providing information to guests who are visiting a vineyard or other type of winery. He or she passes along information such as specific pairings for certain varietals, as well as general information about the vineyard that he or she visits. The main duty of a wine steward is to meet the guests at the entrance of the vineyard, greet them, and pass along information that they may not be aware of otherwise.

Finally

If you want to run your own winery, then you may want to consider becoming a winemaker. Becoming a winemaker involves a lot more responsibility than serving basic appetizers at events. Winemakers must be experts on all facets of winemaking, including fermentation and maturation as well as tasting. Some winemakers work with a team of sommeliers, as they prepare the wine inventory that is distributed to different establishments. Many people that are interested in this career field start out as stockpot holders at local vineyards. As you learn more about wine and tasting, you will likely find your own calling and you can pursue it as a career.

wine

6 Basic Types of Wine

Simply put, wine is simply the fermented juice from a grape. A wine grape, unlike your average grocery store-classical grape, is rather thin, sweet, densely-shedmed, and has many seeds inside. In fact, there are two kinds of grapes used to make wine: black grapes (also called red grapes) and white grapes (also called white grapes). The type of grape you use to make wine depends on what kind of wine you’re making.

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is a red wine that is often made in the central part of Italy, especially in the regions around Bordeaux, Burgundy, and Limoges. Pinot Noir has a fruity, cherry flavor that’s paired particularly well with beef. This wine isn’t very widely distributed, mostly coming from the Bordeaux region of France. Italian wine enthusiasts have a variety of choices for the wine they enjoy, however. They can purchase Pinot Noir at any liquor shop in their local area and enjoy it, or they can buy an imported bottle and enjoy it as well.

Merlot

Merlot is a popular choice among wine enthusiasts. It’s made in the central part of Italy, specifically in the cities of Modena and Venice. Merlot is similar to Pinot Noir in that it is not widely distributed, but it does tend to be more expensive than the latter. Like Pinot Noir, Merlot comes from the same grape used for other Italian wine varieties, and it too has a fruity, cherry flavor that’s rather well-suited to red meats. Like Pinot Noir, Merlot is best purchased from Italy’s most popular liquor stores.

Chardonnay

Chardonnay is a red wine, which may be light or dark in color. It’s made by using different kinds of grape varieties, including both red and black grapes. Chardonnay is served with foods that are heavier on the meat side, including lamb, and is usually served with dessert. Chardonnay is produced primarily in northern France, although it’s also grown in California and Oregon.

Cabernet Sauvignon

Cabernet Sauvignon is a variety of red wines, or rather, dark, spicy reds. There is an extensive variety of Cabernet Sauvignons available, which often comes in distinctive, sharply flavored blends. Some blend Cabernets actually taste quite a bit like their varietals, since the spices used to create them often blend remarkably well with the grapes themselves. Cabernet Sauvignons is very popular because of their ability to pair well with spicy reds, including zesty types like strawberry-red and burgundy types like Syrah. Most people enjoy a nice Cabernet Sauvignon with dessert or as a wine to open the door to when you’re having dinner.

Syrah

Syrah is a red grape, like Cabernet Sauvignon, but it’s much sweeter. In fact, most people find that a high-quality Syrah has less of a kick than a high-quality Cabernet. Syrah pairs very well with dessert foods and is generally enjoyed as a wine to open the door to after dinner.

Rose Wine

Rose Wine is an off-white grape varietal that is sweeter than most of the other types of wine mentioned above. Rose Wine is produced primarily in Australia, South Africa, Italy, Chile, Spain, India, and California. The most common kinds of rose wines are produced in Australia, where it’s produced largely from the Penrillo grapes, but it can also come from old-growth Syrah in France or South African sources. It’s a great wine to pair with many different meals but is especially enjoyable when paired with sweet desserts like pies or chocolates. It pairs very nicely with Roasted Pepper and Chocolate, or with Roasted Peas, or with jam, custards, or cheese.

Finally

These types of Australian varieties of dry wines are very versatile. Each one of these is a dry white, medium-dry red, or dry reds with accents of berry or citrus fruit. Some have notes of peachy or fruity flavors, others are nutty or spicy. This type of varietal wine can be found in different regions throughout Australia, including Margaret River, Barossa Valley, and Clare Valley.